Recommended reading – 24th July 2010

I’ve been a bit neglectful of this blog over the past month or two. Come September, this should change.

I haven’t written a “recommended reading” post for over a month, so I will rectify that by posting two this weekend, featuring the very best of the various articles and blogs I’ve read over the past five weeks.

Without further ado, the first seven links I would strongly suggest that you click on are:

sk

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Recommended Reading – 14th May 2010

Some thought-provoking writing to welcome in the weekend:

  • On the Made by Many blog, Isaac Pinnock shows how user-unfriendly self-service checkouts are. He makes some great points, and it also got me thinking about pre-prepared meals which, when transferred from the packaging to the plate, end up upside down. Which is just wrong.
  • And finally, John Griffiths is putting together a fantastic resource on his Cloud of Knowing site, collecting documents and papers on the future of content analytics and online research. I wasn’t able to attend the most recent get-together, but look forward to attending a future event

sk

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Links – 22nd February 2009

Some of the things I’ve read over the past week and would recommend:

  • A thought-provoking article in the Atlantic on the future of TV. It argues that TV’s USP is immediacy. While there are still cultural reference points via TV, scripted shows will increasingly see TV as just another distribution pattern. TV will therefore move to concentrate on news, current affairs, live reality shows and sport. This makes sense to me given my research – TV excels at events which are essentially DTR-proof, and the most popular shows online are dramas and comedies that can be viewed at leisure and shared/discussed asynchronously. However, I would argue that successful scripted shows still need TV as that anchor point for mainstream cultural crossover.
  • Ana Andjelic has a great post on our general failure to accurately predict the future. Not only does she argue that a lot of campaigns will fail, but also that our limited perspective means we will often follow the same patterns (potentially of failure)

sk

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